Friday, May 13, 2011

The Apostrophe

-->The Apostrophe is a Super Symbols Team member who is really packed with power.  In fact, this hero has three awesome powers all rolled up into his one very amazing punctuation mark.
As you can imagine, keeping track of three powers is a lot of hard work, but don’t worry.  Our hero, The Apostrophe, is super tough and super organized, too.  

Since the placement of an apostrophe can change the very meaning of a word, The Apostrophe uses a specific set of rules that he diligently follows down to the letter.  These rules assist him in making sure that he’s using each of his three different powers effectively and correctly.  Learn these rules; commit them to heart; and you too can possess the apostrophe’s amazing punctuation power—times three!

The Apostrophe’s three powers are: The Power of Contraction, The Power of Omission, and The Power of Possession.  This powerhouse of punctuation uses his first two powers to help keep our sentences streamlined and efficient, and his third power helps to keep us informed about ownership. 

SUPER POWERS:
  • The Power of Contraction
  • The Power of Omission
  • The Power of Possession

1) THE POWER OF CONTRACTION:
The Apostrophe has The Power of Contraction.  He uses this power to contract (squeeze together) two separate words into one single, shorter, efficient word. 

Words like: I’m  (I am), you’re  (you are), they’d (they would), we’ll  (we will), and don’t  (do not) are all contractions.  The apostrophe symbol shows that the word is a contraction, and it also stays to represent the letters that are no longer visible. 

SUPER EXAMPLES:

#1)

Where's my grappling hook?

contraction: Where’s = Where is

#2)
 
He's levitating the building.

contraction: He's = He is

#3)

You shouldn’t touch plutonium.

contraction: shouldn’t = should not


2) THE POWER OF OMISSION:
The Apostrophe has The Power of Omission.  He uses this power to omit (remove or leave out) part of a word to help make it shorter and quicker to say. 

The Apostrophe’s Power of Omission is very similar to his Power of Contraction, except that instead of affecting two words by squeezing them together; he’s only affecting a single word by removing a part of it to make it shorter.  The apostrophe symbol shows that part of the word has been omitted, and it also stays to represent the letters that are no longer visible. 

Keep in mind, however, that The Apostrophe’s power of Omission is considered a very casual form of writing (slang), and it should be avoided in formal writing.

SUPER EXAMPLES:

#1)

I’m goin’ after him!

omission: goin’ = going

#2)
 
That ‘gator is gigantic.

omission: ‘gators = alligators

#3)

Prepare for a world o’ hurt!

contraction: o’ = of


3) THE POWER OF POSSESSION:
The Apostrophe has The Power of Possession.  He uses this power to allow single nouns and plural nouns to show possession (ownership).  

This is an important and useful power because it allows us to show and talk about the relationships between ourselves and other people (I'm Frog-man's sidekick.), as well as the things that belong to each of us (Kitty-Kat's claws are deadly.).  

THE APOSTROPHE SHOWS:
  • Possession for Single Nouns
  • Possession for Plural Nouns

POSSESSION FOR SINGLE NOUNS:
To show that a single noun is in the possessive form, add an‘s.  (Like this: Hero’s)

SUPER EXAMPLES:

#1)

The creature’s breathe is horrible.

#2)
 
The rocket’s thrusters are jammed.

#3)

Turtle-man’s shell is bullet proof.


For single nouns that already end in s (do the same thing), add ‘s.

#4)

The Mantis’s fighting style is tough to beat.

#5)
 
The Boss’s plans always work.

#6)

The Killer Cactus’s needles are deadly.


POSSESSION FOR PLURAL NOUNS:
A lot of plural nouns are already going to end with the letter s (because it’s the letter s that is making them plural in the first place,) so for these words, add the apostrophe after the letter s.  (Like this: Heroes)

SUPER EXAMPLES:

#1)

His fists’ knuckles are like iron.

#2)
 
The thieves’ loot was left behind.

#3)

The scientists’ creation was out of control.


For plural nouns that do not end in s, add ‘s.

#4)

He is the people’s hero.

#5)
 
The fungi’s spores are toxic.

#6)

The children’s gratitude was his reward.

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