Thursday, May 19, 2011

The Parentheses

Just between us, The Parentheses are the very best at sneaking secret messages into your sentences (pretty cool, right?). 
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These super stealthy punctuation symbols, The Parentheses, have the power to sneak secret messages into your unsuspecting sentences.  Their shadowy operations might make them appear to be rule-breakers, but in actuality, their extra level of concealed communication (when used correctly) only adds to the overall effectiveness of our sentences.  

Here’s how they work: the first parenthesis shields the front end of the secret message, and the second parenthesis closes off the back end.  Together, they create a covert barrier (like a cloaking device) that, both, hides the secret message away from the rest of the sentence and simultaneously keeps it visible to the reader (that’s you).  This way, the secret message never interferes with the structure of the sentence, but it still allows the reader to receive the hidden communication.  

This ability to infiltrate sentences with their parenthetical notes makes The Parentheses a strong and strategic addition to the Super Symbols Super-Team.  With their punctuation powers, we can add secret messages of various sizes (including: single words, phrases, or even entire sentences), and we can add them to various places within our sentences, too (such as: the beginning, middle, or end)

Just make sure to keep this one thing in mind. The Parentheses are a team, so always keep them paired together.  If you don’t—you’ll totally blow their cover. (And that would really suck.)

SUPER POWERS:
The Parentheses have the power to sneak secret messages into your sentences. 

USE THE PARENTHESES TO:
  • add clarification
  • add useful information
  • add commentary

SUPER EXAMPLES:

#1)

He’s robbed every bank in the country (US).

Parenthetical note: adding clarification

#2)
 
I have traveled one lightyear (about 6 trillion miles) to be here.

Parenthetical note: adding useful information

#3)

That missile must be stopped (no matter the cost).

Parenthetical note: adding commentary

#4)

You’re an evil tyrant! (And you smell bad, too.)

Parenthetical note: adding commentary (sometimes very personal)

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